Focus on the AFMC Networks

The NETWORKS at AFMC have evolved. Originally many started as “interest groups” of like-minded educators who came together naturally to share challenges and resources. A common refrain heard a decade ago was: “Well, we will all be at CCME anyway, so why don’t we meet there?” What began as an informal gathering of 2 groups (Professionalism and Social Accountability were among the first two groups to convene), has grown into 24 Networks and 4 Committees with comprehensive representation from the 17 Faculties of Medicine. Leadership for the Networks is provided by great AFMC citizens who are volunteers from within their ranks. The work of our Networks is an inherent part of our core at AFMC as they lead innovation, discovery and produce real measures of our collective impact.

This section of EducationMatters will highlight the work of two networks in each Volume.

The AFMC Faculty Development Network

By Karen Leslie

Faculty Development is a systematic process whereby faculty are supported and assisted by institutions to acquire and expand their knowledge and skills in teaching, education, administration, leadership, research, and other areas relevant to their faculty roles. The process is facilitated through informal and formal learning activities and educational programs, as well interventions at the organizational level.

The AFMC Faculty Development Network is a community of Faculty Development leaders who locally and nationally promote best practices in innovative and effective faculty development to support excellence in medical education for undergraduate, postgraduate, graduate and continuing education.  All 17 schools are represented in this highly engaged and collaborative group who participate in regular teleconferences as well as an annual meeting and learning event at CCME each year. The AFMC Faculty Development Network has been a highly successful group and one of the longest standing collaboratives in our AFMC family. Almost none of the initiatives in medical education in the past decade have been launched without substantial investment in FacDev and the leaders from our Network are passionate about the careers and future of teaching faculty within the academic health science centers and within the community setting.

What does Faculty Development in Canada Look Like?

In 2016 an annual survey to all FacDev Leads was developed and administered. All 17 schools responded and here are some of the results:

Educator Development

Faculty development programs and activities engage a diverse group of participants at our schools:

In addition, most FD units (69% or 12/17) have some faculty development responsibility for other faculties outside of medicine. These faculties/departments include Nursing, Dentistry, Audiology & Speech Sciences, Genetic Counselling, Midwifery, Occupational Therapy, Physiotherapy, Respiratory Therapy, Population & Public Health, Kinesiology, Rehabilitation, Biomedical Sciences, Pharmacy, and Physician Assistants.

Faculty Development offices and centres offer a broad scope of programs and supports to individual faculty and to their institutions:

Faculty Development Audience

Some Current Areas of Work:

  • Supporting the preparation for and implementation of CBME
  • Exploring how best to support
  • Basic Science Faculty
  • Collaborative work with CPD colleagues
  • Building the Network at CCME and other academic meetings
  • Advancing the field of Faculty Development through Scholarship and Research

The AFMC Interprofessional Education Network

By Sylvia Langlois and Christie Newton

“Interprofessional education occurs when students from two or more professions learn about, from and with each other to enable effective collaboration and improve health outcomes. Interprofessional education is a necessary step in preparing a collaborative practice-ready health workforce that is better prepared to respond to local health needs.” Source: World Health Organization (2010): Framework for Action on Interprofessional Education & Collaborative Practice

Interprofessional Network
Pictured: Sylvia Langlois, Christie Newton & Sharla King

 

The AFMC Interprofessional Education Network facilitates national collaboration among all of the Faculties of Medicine and serves in an advisory role to the President and CEO, AFMC. More specifically, the IPE Network functions as a collegium to provide topic-specific support across the Faculties, provides a venue for discussions, and the sharing of knowledge and experience among the leaders. Topics of interest include the current state of interprofessional education, curriculum-related issues, implementation strategies, faculty development, interprofessional small group facilitation approaches, assessment of collaborative competencies, and program evaluation. With such a tall order, presentations and discussions at Network meetings are both engaging and informative.

Approximately two years ago, the Network struck a Steering Committee and an Assessment Working Group that are addressing one of the key priority areas identified by the Network. The latter working group is conducting a scan of assessment measures used for collaborative competencies across the Faculties of Medicine. This unique project has never done in Canada and will have far-reaching effects on learning and evaluating the impact of IPE linked to interprofessional practice. The group has liaised with the international consortium on assessment of IPE, reviewed the international consensus statement on assessment of IPE and will prepare a position statement on best practices of the assessment of collaborative competencies in the Canadian context. It is anticipated that through the AFMC network on IPE, the report will facilitate a coordinated pan-Canadian approach to assessment of IPE competencies.

With broad and substantive membership across all 17 Faculties of Medicine, the AFMC IPE Network is an excellent example of a group working collaboratively to promote interprofessional education across the Faculties. In an environment of numerous barriers to full collaboration across Faculties and universities, the IPE Network membership has facilitated open sharing of resources and solution-oriented sharing in a collaborative approach. In the context of this supportive environment, the IPE agenda is sure to advance across the Canadian Faculties.

The AFMC – Interprofessional Education Network facilitates national collaboration among all of the Faculties of Medicine and serves in an advisory role to the President and CEO, AFMC. More specifically, the IPE Network functions as a collegium to provide topic-specific support across the Faculties, provides a venue for discussions, and the sharing of knowledge and experience among the leaders. Topics of interest include the current state of interprofessional education, curriculum-related issues, implementation strategies, faculty development, interprofessional small group facilitation approaches, assessment of collaborative competencies, and program evaluation. With such a tall order, presentations and discussions at Network meetings are both engaging and informative. The AFMC – Interprofessional Education Network facilitates national collaboration among all of the Faculties of Medicine and serves in an advisory role to the President and CEO, AFMC. More specifically, the IPE Network functions as a collegium to provide topic-specific support across the Faculties, provides a venue for discussions.